We're essential to you, and we're open for your health.
As always, our focus at McKenzie Sports Physical Therapy is on your health and well-being. In this time of concern, please be assured that our small office remains a safe space for all and that we plan to remain open for business as usual.

 We’ve increased our emphasis on existing cleaning and sanitation procedures and will continue to implement preventative measures to ensure your health and safety.

Please reschedule your appointment as soon as you can if you are not feeling well or feel you are putting yourself or others at risk.

If you are older, please use your best judgment whether you should continue with your physical rehab at this time. I believe it is wise for those with advanced age to stay home. In lieu of in person treatments, we can schedule a time to talk about what else you should be doing at home, so you can continue to progress.

Thank you for your faith in our office to help you achieve your goals.

Chris McKenzie
(267) 332-8102

When is the last time you saw an overhead athlete maintain a static position to perform their sport movement?!?  Can’t think of any?  Think harder…….still nothing? That’s because no athlete EVER, since the beginning of time has maintained a static or non-moving body during their sport movement.  OK, what am I trying to get at?  The CORE. How many of you have been trained, or are training people to strengthen their core through static means?  What I mean is any movement that you get into and then hold; for instance the plank exercise. This exercise was once the grand-daddy of core training and core stability. Now, it’s hit rock bottom. Why? Ever hear of functional training? Well, the plank, no matter which way you slice it, unless you get very very creative, is a static core strength exercise. It is not functional to your sport because your sport involves movement! Thus we need to train your core to be strong throughout your sport movement…and the plank won’t do it.  So, have a look at these static core strengthening exercises known as planks, and then keep them in your arsenal for times of extreme weakness or for simple, beginner rehabilitation. These should not be used in sport performance.

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[h2]Prone Plank[/h2]
By Dr Chris McKenzie
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[h2]Lateral Plank[/h2]
By Dr Chris McKenzie
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